Displaying 246 - 280 of 457

Voices of Authority and Divergence: Authorship in the Anglo-Saxon Period and in the Later Middle Ages

Stanley (Toby) Levers, Haas Scholar 2001 - 2002 : Comp Literature/Italian Studies

Bringing together and expanding his research on Anglo-Saxon and later medieval literature, Toby will investigate the "author function" as it appears (and often disappears) in these two periods. The starting point for his study will be a broad dissimilarity: in one period (the later middle ages), the idea of authorship is constantly obsessed over and manipulated;... Read More

Incitement to Discourse: The Lord Chamberlain’s Censorship of Plays in Late Victorian England, 1890-1910

Matthew Lewsadder, Haas Scholar 1999 - 2000 :

Matthew’s project will take him to the British Library in London this summer, where he will investigate the censorship of plays during the transition from Victorianism into Modernism. In particular, he will be examining the significant role the Lord Chamberlain played in maintaining English “morality” through his censorship powers. Taking Foucault’s theories as a... Read More

A Spot for Us in Every Home: Deciphering the Creation and Proliferation of Queer Culture in Mass Culture

Gary K. Li, Haas Scholar 2004 - 2005 : American Studies/English

With an upsurge of homosexuals under the spotlight of popular culture, the inescapable visibility and representation of queerness leads to the crucial question of whether this ubiquity automatically denotes acceptance or even tolerance. Gary’s project, which will result in his Honors Thesis for American Studies, will delve headlong into the issues surrounding the... Read More

Development of a Memory Selection Device for Engineering Bacteria

Samantha Liang, Haas Scholar 2008 - 2009 : Bioengineering

In order for synthetic biology to overcome the limitations of using only naturally-derived biological activities, tools for developing and identifying engineered genetic components with desired biochemical, enzymatic, or regulatory properties are greatly needed. Samantha is building a genetic threshold-gated memory selection circuit incorporating positive/negative... Read More

Object Recognition by Contour Extraction

Joseph J. Lim, Haas Scholar 2008 - 2009 : Computer Science/Applied Mathematics

Current Bio:  Since graduation, Joseph completed his PhD at MIT and postdoc at Stanford. He started a tenure-track faculty career at the University of Southern California, and is leading the Cognitive Learning for Vision and Robotics (CLVR) lab. He works on teaching robots to learn and solve complex physical tasks, such as furniture assembly.... Read More

Role of the DSB System in the Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella

Jihoon Lim, Haas Scholar 2006 - 2007 : Molecular and Cell Biology

Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) is one of the leading causes of foodborne illnesses and mortalities. A major factor behind its virulence is its ability to survive well in the presence of hydrogen peroxide generated by macrophages through respiratory burst. Previous research has shown dsbD mutants of S. typhimurium to be more susceptible to hydrogen... Read More

Re-telling Retail: The Intersection of High-Tech Products and Low-Wage Service Work

Annie Lin, Haas Scholar 2009 - 2010 : Sociology / Public Policy

Past research on the service sector indicates that workers often suffer from negative psychological consequences when forced by their managers to be friendly. Workers, workers' rights advocates, businesspeople, and scholars alike have therefore searched for ways to set up the work environment such that workers will be friendly even without management coercion.... Read More

Collapsing the Frame: The Moving Body as a Site for Social (De)construction

Sara Sol Linck-Frenz, Haas Scholar 2013 - 2014 : Comparative Literature (minor: Dance and Performance Studies)

Collapsing the Frame delves into the space between two categories – “contemporary” and “commercial” dance  – to ask how the moving body functions as a site both for composing and deconstructing normative conceptions of embodiment, physicality, identity, and sociality. By researching the particular case of commercially produced choreographies, the... Read More

Establishment of a Kinetic Analysis Framework for the Activity of an RNase P Ribozyme

Kwa Yu Liou, Haas Scholar 1998 - 1999 :

Kwa's Senior Honors Thesis in Molecular and Cell Biology will investigate the RNase P ribozyme, which is one of many RNA enzymes being developed as promising gene-targeting reagents to cleave specific RNA sequences. Kwa's research will establish a kinetic framework to analyze the catalytic mechanism of RNase P ribozyme to cleave a viral mRNA. By determining the... Read More

Chemical Design, Synthesis, and Clinical Exploitation of Promising Ligands Having High Affinity for the TRP-M8 Receptor of Prostate Cancer Cells

Amanda Liu, Haas Scholar 2005 - 2006 : Molecular and Cell Biology/Public Health

Amanda will investigate a novel method of diagnosing, staging, monitoring, and treating prostate cancer. The specific phases of her investigation include optimizing the design and synthesis of N-radiofluoro or N-radioiodo-aryl-cycloalkylcarboxamides, which have high affinity for the TRP (transient receptor potential)-M8 receptor found in prostate cancer cells;... Read More

Development of New Genetic Techniques for Studying Photosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

Mingen (Jason) Liu, Haas Scholar 2008 - 2009 : Plant and Microbial Biology

In his project, Jason intends to examine the possibility of site-targeting or HR in the PSY gene of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii – a unicellular alga and a model organism for studying photosynthesis. He will generate mutant populations through transformations with a plasmid containing a defective copy of the PSY gene and will then screen for successful gene-... Read More

How (And Should) Government Regulate Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis?

Crystal Liu, Haas Scholar 2004 - 2005 : Political Science/Molecular Cell Biology

The aim of Crystal's project - the culmination of which will constitute her senior honors thesis in political science - is to discuss whether (and more importantly how) preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) should be regulated. Crystal will be traveling to Washington, DC to address whether the objections behind PGD can be practically dealt with through various types... Read More

Intracellular Studies of the Thalamo Cortical Circuit

John Davis Long, Haas Scholar 2001 - 2002 : Molecular and Cell Biology/Philosophy

Philosophers and scientists alike have puzzled over the question of how we experience the visual world. A double major in Molecular & Cell Biology and Philosophy, John will take up this question from a scientific perspective for his Senior Honors Thesis in MCB. Focusing on the transmission of information between the thalamus and the cortex, he will use the... Read More

Closed Mouths Don't Get Fed:" (Re) becoming a rehabilitated parent in Court Mandated Parenting Classes

Jessica Lopez, Haas Scholar 2012 - 2013 : Anthropology

In an anthropolitical and linguistic analysis that values human agency, individual thought, and community discourse, Jessica’s work explores the embodied experience of Latino parents who attend court-mandated parenting classes in East Los Angeles. Current research on minority populations shows that Latino parents continue to view state intervention as judgmental,... Read More

The Forgotten Afro-Mexicans: Independence and the Role of Women (1800-1830)

Lupita Lúa, Haas Scholar 2019 - 2020 : History

In 2015, Afro-Mexicans were recognized as an ethnic group in the Mexican national census for the first time in history. However, their history continues to be suppressed by the state and few studies address the role that Afro-Mexican people, especially women,  played during Mexico’s struggle for... Read More

The Permissibility of Using Coercion in Pediatric Healthcare

Diana Lutfi, Haas Scholar 2017 - 2018 : Interdisciplinary Studies

Why is causing “harm” ethically justifiable? Diana has always been perplexed that a rational individual would compromise his/her bodily comfort in order to prolong life and create a culture where other people are forced to do the same for the sake of “health”. Although patient autonomy is legally protected in western healthcare institutions, individuals that... Read More

Unpacking the Paradox of In-group Derogation Via Dialecticism, Power, and Affect

Christine Ma, Haas Scholar 2005 - 2006 : Psychology/Spanish major

How do you reconcile the phenomenon of self-directed racism by certain minority/oppressed groups towards their own members with the “universal” trend of ethnocentrism? Given past documentation of such “ingroup derogation,” questions remain: if ingroup derogation indeed exists among minorities and leads to negative affect towards other group members, then it will... Read More

Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of Prefrontal Cortex: Examining Effects on Causal Learning

Bridget MacDonald, Haas Scholar 2014 - 2015 : Cognitive Science

Children acquire complex knowledge about the world despite severely limited evidence available to them. While both children and adults use learned biases as a useful learning mechanism, children’s relatively small amount of prior knowledge results in fewer constraints on their hypothesis space as well as more open-minded approaches when considering possible... Read More

#BlackGirlsMatterToo: Understanding and Disrupting the School to Prison Pipeline Among Black Girls

Shelby Mack, Haas Scholar 2017 - 2018 : Legal Studies, Education minor

Black girls are disproportionately impacted by school discipline policies and practices that render them vulnerable to abuse, exploitation and dehumanization. It has been shown in multiple studies that Black girls who are suspended or expelled are more likely to become incarcerated later. Shelby Mack’s research seeks to identify factors such as school... Read More

Bifurcated Hope: Stoic Suicide and Christian Martyrdom in First Century Rome

Karen MacLaughlin, Haas Scholar 2015 - 2016 : Classical Languages

In first century Rome, increasing numbers of the elite class chose to commit suicide rather than forfeit their honor in the courtroom or on the battlefield. Although Stoicism had its detractors in Late Antiquity, suicide was considered by many Romans to be a rational choice. Roman Christians, however, drawn from all social classes, chose to submit to various... Read More

A Social History of Jordanian Communities During World War I

Mathew Madain, Haas Scholar 2018 - 2019 : History, Global Studies, and Near Eastern Studies majors

The centennial anniversary of World War I has generated much scholarship on large-scale atrocities against religious minority communities of the Ottoman Empire. However, historiography on the period has neglected to discuss smaller-scale religious violence that also occurred in Ottoman provinces, most notably against the Christian communities of Transjordan (1914... Read More

Hidden in Plain View: Cannabis Clubs, Visibility, and Power in the Urban Landscapes of the Bay Area and Amsterdam

Joen Madonna, Haas Scholar 2005 - 2006 : Geography

Understanding landscapes as a representation of our culture is a part of the human experience. Although often unaware consciously of the way our buildings and streets shape our attitudes and opinions, the things seen and “unseen” have a profound effect on our perspective of the world around us. We think of public space as normalized and “legal”, yet the... Read More

Tracing the Influence of Giulio Caccini's 'Le nuove musiche' on Seventeenth-Century English Composers

Alana Mailes, Haas Scholar 2012 - 2013 : Music

Current Bio:  Alana has been in graduate school for musicology and sings semi-professionally.

Haas Scholars Project:  Alana’s project focuses on the 1664 English translation of Giulio Caccini’s preface to Le nuove musiche (1601), one of the best-known texts about ornamentation of vocal music during the Baroque period.... Read More

Poisoned Clouds: Dealing with Pesticide Drift in California’s Agricultural Communities

Jason Malinsky, Haas Scholar 2003 - 2004 : Individual Major: Environmental Policy and Investigative Journalism

An Individual Major in “Environmental Policy and Investigative Reporting”, Jason intends to conduct research on a July 8, 2002, pesticide-poisoning incident in Arvin, California. In the incident, over 250 people were allegedly poisoned by a known carcinogenic pesticide. Focusing on issues of accountability and government response, Jason will use Arvin as a case... Read More

Dying to Survive: Negotiating with Early Death and the Social Reproduction of Gang Violence

Jorge David Mancillas, Haas Scholar 2016 - 2017 : Sociology

Jorge-David Mancillas will be traveling to Los Angeles to conduct research on the effectiveness of gang intervention. In Los Angeles, the so-called “gang capital of the world”, more than half of the yearly homicides are gang-related. Homeboy Industries, a gang intervention program located in East Los Angeles, is the most successful gang intervention program... Read More

Managing Type I Diabetes During Adolescence: Social Relationships and Identity

Willie Joe Marquez, Haas Scholar 2011 - 2012 : Sociology, Education (minor)

Current Bio:  After graduation, Willie worked in customer support, marketing, operations and sales functions within various private-sector Ecommerce companies. While working, Willie completed part-time programs to earn his Masters in Public Administration at USC and a Masters in Business Administration at UCLA. He currently works as a Senior Account... Read More

Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo with People to Classify Facial Affect

Jay Martin, Haas Scholar 2008 - 2009 : Cognitive Science/Statistics

Cognitive science aims to understand how people represent the structure of the world around them. Faces are thought to be windows to some of these representations, namely emotions, which are related to facial expressions biologically and culturally. Labeling expressions is a seemingly effortless task for people, but explaining the subtleties is much more... Read More

Perceptions of Historical Black College and University Prestige: Implications for Racial Stereotypes

Kimberly Martin, Haas Scholar 2016 - 2017 : Psychology major, Dance & Performance Studies minor

Many people assume that racism is a binary dimension whereby people are either racist or not. However, over forty years of research indicates that not only are there several distinctive forms of racism, but that they exist on a continuum. Recent trends have shown that while blatant forms of racism seem to be decreasing, there are indirect forms of racism now... Read More

Peer to Peer Piracy: Sustained Cooperation in a Public Good Game

Seung-Keun Martinez, Haas Scholar 2012 - 2013 : Economics

Modern day pirates are among the most seemingly altruistic collaborators in the world. At least they are in reference to sustaining a public good. In fact, these internet based pirates provide a stunning real world example of a self-sustaining public good despite strong incentives to free ride. We observe this phenomenon in peer to peer (P2P) file sharing. The crux of... Read More

The Presence of Arthuriana in the Philippines: An Analysis of A Filipino Arthurian text

Stefanie Matabang, Haas Scholar 2010 - 2011 : English/Celtic Studies

This project sets out to examine the acquisition of the Arthurian literary cycle by the canon of Filipino literature. Focusing on the only two Filipino translated Arthurian texts, Tablante de Ricamonte and Percibal, Stefanie will be doing analytical and comparative work on the texts and the Spanish counterparts from which they are derived. Traveling to Chicago and the... Read More

Financial Constraints on Student Learning: An Analysis of How Financial Stress Influences Perception and Cognitive Function in Children

Simone Matecna, Haas Scholar 2019 - 2020 : Economics, Peace & Conflict Studies

 Policy makers and developmental psychologists know that addressing the effects of poverty in adults often comes too late to be effective. Imagine a 30-year-old man named Sal who does not know whether or not he will be able to pay his rent or buy food for his family at the end of the month. It is not hard to understand why this uncertainty might cause Sal... Read More

Rastafari in Jamaica: Resistance to State Economic Policies

Shannon Mathes, Haas Scholar 2002 - 2003 : Interdisciplinary Studies Field

Shannon will examine the effects that Rastafarianism has had on the political economy of Jamaica since the implementation of structural adjustment programs by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in 1977. Specifically, she will describe and analyze the ways in which Rastafarian organizations have challenged the policies of the Jamaican state regarding land use,... Read More

Out of Denmark: Isak Dinesen in a Colonial Context

Marie Mathiesen, Haas Scholar 2002 - 2003 : English/Scandinavian

Marie will examine the works of the Danish writer Karen Blixen (1885-1962), known in America as Isak Dinesen. Dinesen lived in Kenya for 16 years, and although she was a colonialist, she respected the Africans as aristocratic and noble human beings. Her position and relations to the Africans grant her a unique dual perspective on the colonial situation in Kenya... Read More

Berta Vive: A Look at the Engagement of California Hondureñas in the Politics of Slain Environmental Activist Berta Caceres

Lulu Matute, Haas Scholar 2018 - 2019 : American Studies major

Hundreds of environmental activists have been killed for defending land and natural resources in Honduras. Although Berta Cáceres was one of many slain activists, she is the most renowned globally. This is largely due to her transnational coalition-building efforts and Goldman Environmental Prize recognition. Berta was an outspoken Indigenous Lenca leader and a... Read More

The Population Genetics of the Serpentine Endemic, Leather Oak (Quercus durata)

Christopher McCarron, Haas Scholar 2020 - 2021 : Conservation and Resource Studies

Soils derived from serpentine rock host a unique flora while being distributed throughout California in scattered outcrops. Their insularity makes them ideal for examining the evolution and divergence of species restricted to them, such as the leather oak (Quercus durata var. durata). Chris McCarron’s honors thesis will use reduced genome DNA sequencing for 310 samples... Read More

Pages