Kristine Lawson

Drawing on over five decades of folklore from U.C. Berkeleys Folklore Archives, as well as interviews and ethnographic participant observation to be conducted at Occupy events this summer, Kristine’s project draws comparisons between the folklore of the Free Speech Movement of 1964 and of the Occupy Movement of 2011-2012. With an understanding of folklore as promoting group identity and perpetuating notions of group boundaries, Kristine will trace pieces of folklore through each movement to demonstrate these tendencies. She will also examine the significance of the UC Berkeley campus as a venue for protest. Preliminary analysis of folklore in both movements suggests a strong resemblance in the folk speech, art, gestures, and customs while also suggesting some amount of transformation between the 1960s lore and that heard today.

Keng Lam

Worldwide, we have more than 33 million people living with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus). It remains a challenge to find the best prevention methods. Keng’s research compares two new biomedical prevention methods that have used ART (antiretroviral therapy) to prevent HIV transmission in discordant couples (one member is infected but the other is not). One method is PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis), where the uninfected person takes antiretroviral drugs, and the other method begins ART in the infected member earlier than is clinically recommended to prevent transmission. The clinical trials data from both methods are published and available for analysis. Keng will use meta-analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis to compare and contrast both prevention strategies for a cohort of heterosexual couples living in southern Africa.

Humberto Ortiz

Humbertos project will examine how Latino/a undocumented migrant youth negotiate migrant illegality in their everyday lives through relationships of love, kinship, and companionship. While a growing literature has examined how this population navigates public contexts of higher education and civic engagement, no scholarship has analyzed how these youth negotiate their undocumented status in their private, personal lives. In order to investigate how undocumented young adults develop unique attitudes, beliefs, and experiences with respect to friendships, dating, and marriage, I will interview 20 self-identified Latina/o undocumented young adults from the Bay Area and Los Angeles to answer the following question: How does migrant (il)legal status become a social-political power dynamic that must be negotiated by undocumented young adults in their personal relationships?

Kristen Norman

In an effort to narrow the gap in gender equality and improve public health, microfinance institutions are increasingly creating products for women in developing countries. Experts caution against assuming that women’s empowerment is an automatic outcome of microfinance, and call for accompanying soft services such as health education, literacy training, and discussion groups on domestic violence. Organizations offering such services have had great results. However, the majority of micro lending institutions are for-profit entities uninterested in offering these expensive social services. Kristen’s project investigates the dynamics of group lending and its ability to create female empowerment in the absence of these ideal soft services. She hypothesizes that the trust and solidarity created through group-oriented micro lending offers the social support needed to create women’s empowerment.

Gabriela Monico

An estimated 11.2 million unauthorized immigrants live in the U.S. 2.1 million youth may attempt to legalize through the DREAM Act, if enacted. An activist movement led by eligible youth has mobilized around this legislation, which has given rise to a narrative that casts eligible youth as deserving, othering the 67% that would not qualify. Through interviews and participant observation of two support groups, Rising Immigrant Scholars through Education and 67 Sueos, Gabriela will explore how the DREAM Act narrative has triggered a divergent process of oppositional consciousness among ineligible youth and how new sites of activism are created in the process. Her work will provide insight into a struggle that seeks to humanize immigrants and challenges mainstream notions of who should have access to opportunities in American society.

Danica Rodarmel

Current Bio: Previously an Equal Justice Works fellow at Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights working on bail reform and bail bonds issues. In Jan. 2020, Danica became the Policy Director of State Legislative Affairs at the San Francisco Public Defender’s Office. Haas Scholars Project: Among Dreams illuminates the collective, un-fixed identities of incarcerated individuals in the Bay Area by interweaving dream narratives and personal histories. The project will culminate in two publications: one book devoted to the inmates work and another devoted to Danica’s experiences with familial incarceration and prison work. The books will explore reoccurring or unshakable dream narratives and personal stories, along with photographic interpretations of places and images significant to the dreams and memories. Interweaving dreams through the personal stories will help illuminate points of connection between the authors experiences and identities by drawing attention to reoccurring themes. A primary a goal of Among Dreams is counteracting […]

Barira Rashid

Since the fall of ex-president Hosni Mubarak, street art has become the most widespread form of political expression in Egypt since the Egyptian Revolution began on January 25th, 2011. As a means to proclaim the goals of the revolution and mock the military regime in power, Barira will further explore how political graffiti and street art have come to signify a powerful form of expression of social justice in the ongoing movement. Barira will travel to Cairo to document political graffiti and street art through photography and video, interview underground graffiti artists, and lead participant observations with street art collectives. Her work seeks to examine how public space and nationalism promote civic belonging and aims to preserve the disappearing artistic narrative of the struggle for civilian democratic rule in Egypt.

Alice Yeh

Foreign language education in a study-abroad setting is taken for granted as a means of acquiring fluency and cultural competency. But for a language without a living space, as Latin arguably is, what is it like to be physically situated in a concrete, historical locale without a native community of speakers? Based in an immersion program in Rome, Alice’s research will focus on the relationship between techniques of instruction and students acquisition and transformation of Latin. She will investigate the boundary between a more immersive approach and the method of grammar-translation, the different functions of English and Latin metalanguage, or talk about talk, and the challenges of restoring Latin. Renewed in practice and radically reframed, Latin is a language still becoming, a language whose life beyond life must be understood.

Irene Steves

Stomatopods, also known as mantis shrimp, are some of the coolest marine crustaceans. They are powerful predators (for their size, at least) and are concentrated in tropical waters all over the world. The stomatopod rostrum, a segment of exoskeleton near the eyes, ranges from a simple triangular shape to something that looks more like a crown or the curved top of a palace. This summer, Irene will be looking into the evolutionary motivations of stomatopod rostrum variation. She plans to determine the function of the rostrum and the reasons for its wide variation by compiling environmental data, taking high-speed videos of stomatopod behaviors, and comparing rostrum shapes to their phylogeny.

Kimberly Salyers

Extensive work has been done on the civic centers of Classic Maya culture. However, archaeological study of Maya commoners has been scarce until recent years. Kimberly’s research will focus on the artifacts uncovered in an excavated household at Chinikih, Mexico. Through a catchment analysis using GIS mapping, she will assess the economic resource basis for settlement. A catchment is the zone from which residents of a place drew their resources. This research will allow Kimberly to consider Chinikih within a larger context: she will look at the relation of commoner households to major Maya centers such as Palenque in order to assess how the carrying capacity of the Chinikih areas natural resources strengthened or weakened integration with the wider region.