Food, Medicine, Supplies, and Freedom

America 2020, a creative vision of the political and social realities of the United States in the year 2020, will be an artistic presentation of Javier Aros. Utilizing room sculpture, six large silkscreen poster prints and assorted smaller prints, two wall paintings, ceramic busts, original flags and interactive historical documents and presentations, Javier will carefully design and create a future museum dedicated to the revolutionary and evolutionary events of the teen years of the 21st century. By thoroughly investigating and evaluating revolutionary methodology and methods — from independence from non-renewable energy to economic reformation and political revolution — Javier intends to illustrate through his art an intuitive, rational and applicable path through the political and cultural straits in which we find ourselves today.

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Humanities

Reframing Zen: An Analysis of Morita Shiryu's Japanese Avant Garde Calligraphy

Sabrina Carletti’s project will inquire into Japanese postwar calligraphy within the Zen’ei bijutsu (avant-garde) movement while focusing on the calligraphy of Morita Shiry_ (1926-1999), who brought radical changes to calligraphy practice by leading the bokujin-kai, or the Human Ink Society. Sabrina intends to depart from the familiar influence model of Japanese and Western avant-gardes by arguing for a more complex understanding of Zen in Japanese modern calligraphy. Sabrina will travel to Japan to study works by Morita at the Museums of Modern Art, Tokyo and Kyoto, and to New York to observe works by Franz Kline and other Abstract Expressionist artists at the Museum of Modern Art. .

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Humanities

Understanding Our Legacy: How the Free Speech Movement and Third World Liberation Front Affected Curricular Reform at UC Berkeley

My research analyzes the education reform that took place at UC Berkeley at the end of the 1960s to determine whether social movements such as the Free Speech Movement and Third World Liberation Front affected University curricula and pedagogy. Imperative to the research is a critical discussion of the power dynamic between students and the UC administration. I analyze the effect that the FSM had on curriculum reform, through the creation of a Free University and other experimental programs. The second component of my research looks at the historical context in which a student movement, the Third World Strike, established an Ethnic Studies Department at UC Berkeley that has lasted throughout the years. Crucial to this research is historicizing the different moment in which these movements occurred from 1964-69, and the influence that local, national, and international movements had on the students. This summer I had the opportunity the work […]

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Humanities

The Architecture of the Invisible: Women, Workers, and Water in the New Argentine Cinema

Current Bio: Nicole completed an MFA at UCLA in Film Production. She’s since been working in cultural programming in the non-profit sector: Palm Springs Int’l Film Society/Festivals, IKAR (ritual and advocacy), and now at Friends Of The Observatory, the non-profit fundraising and advocacy partner of Griffin Observatory in Los Angeles, CA Haas Scholars Project: The placement of a womans body attests to the gender dynamics of a film, so how do recurring spatial settings figure female characters into the collective national imagination? To address this question Nicole will conduct a survey of contemporary womens roles in American and Argentine national cinemas. She will approach this project through a phenomenological lens because phenomenology views the body as a mediated image through which actual historical and cultural expectations emerge. Nicole will assess twenty films made since 1995; she will include mainstream blockbusters that target domestic audiences and experimental films that are screened […]

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Humanities

Philosophy, Creativity, and Spirituality: a Study of Puran Singh

Morality, as a realm approached by philosophers to be captured by theory and grounded upon metaphysics, as the realm in which the good is discriminated from the evil or the bad by faculties of reason, is subverted by sublime gestures of the poet. These sublime gestures in the prose of Puran Singh have specifically subverted the ethical foundations of Brahmanism and Vedanta through the experience of the Sikh path. Randeep Singh’s research will delve into the Sikh experiences, in dialogue with the Western tradition of metaphysics, to provide some insights into the critique Puran Singh offers of the modernist philosophical idiom rooted in Enlightenment thought. In doing so, Randeep’s travels to Punjab will involve contact with the Punjabi and English prose left for us by Puran Singh.

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Humanities

'Apparently, they cannot bear the light': Privacy, Performance, and Propriety in Dutch Neighborhoods

According to Franklin Becker, “the most functional buildings and environments can be highly symbolic, often in undesired and unexpected ways.” Using the window as a symbol imbued with strong cross-cultural meanings, Sirianand intends to explore current tensions between native Dutch and Dutch-Moroccan immigrants through their use of visible domestic space. She believes that the striking differences between the ways in which Moroccan immigrants and the ethnic Dutch conceive of this boundary between the public and private spheres illuminate the different ways they view the world. She also believes that Moroccan immigrants are unintentionally communicating a strong symbolic message to the native Dutch through the use of seemingly innocuous window dressings. Sirianand will travel to the Netherlands this summer, conducting informal interviews with both native and immigrant Dutch residents, as well as observing and documenting features of the built environment in Holland’s major cities.

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Humanities

Redefining the Battle of Chavez Ravine: The Quest for Public Housing in 1950's Los Angeles

Sabina will travel to Los Angeles to examine historical evidence of the communication between the citizen and the politician to control the shape of the physical landscape of Chavez Ravine. Chavez Ravine was once a thriving Mexican-American community removed for construction of a massive public-housing site yet today Chavez Ravine is home to Dodger Stadium. Using the papers of prominent politicians, Mayor Norris Poulson and City Councilman Edward Roybal, she will examine the campaign rhetoric employed by these candidates who were at odds on the issue of public-housing and the response from the community. The battle between the residents, the city, the state, the federal government and the building industries for control of Chavez Ravine influenced public-housing policy across the nation and shaped the political and physical landscape of Los Angeles.

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Humanities

The Armenians of Lebanon: Political Presence and Participation Since 1975

Khatchadour will travel to Beirut, Lebanon this summer to study Armenian and Lebanese community formation. By conducting interviews and implementing professionally administered surveys, he hopes to gain a more insightful understanding of how each community views itself in relation to the other. Khatchadour will also meet with community leaders and politicians to assess the impact of communal relations on local politics. By analyzing the political, economic, and socio-cultural frameworks the Armenian community employs to express its uniqueness, Khatchadour hopes to comprehend assimilation and community development in the Lebanese context.

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Humanities

Abrasive Reconciliation: Negotiating El Salvadors Transition to Democracy

Spencer will travel to El Salvador this summer and conduct anthropological fieldwork focusing on the not-for-profit organization Pro-Búsqueda. Focusing primarily on reuniting children disappeared in the Salvadoran civil war with their biological families, workers at Pro-Búsqueda have not only helped to advocate processes of justice and repatriation but have also played an important role in lobbying for reparations legislation as well. Using ethnographic methods, Spencer will collect data through first-hand participant observation and interviews in order to examine the importance of finding and reuniting children in reconstructing civil society and engaging social trauma in El Salvador. Much work and scholarly literature has focused solely upon the immediate aftermath of the civil war conflict, and Spencer hopes that his fieldwork will provide a critical study of ongoing post-conflict social reconciliation.

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Humanities

Keys to the House

In recent decades, artists and writers have created self-narrations that deliberately thwart the conventions of autobiography and question even the most contemporary conceptions of the self and self-representation. Inspired by these works, as his ISF honors thesis Sam will create an autobiographical installation entitled Parthenogenesis, a term meaning asexual reproduction, which refers here to effectively creating oneself due to the difficulty of remembering ones past in light of both having very few photographic mnemonics, as well as having faced numerous hardships during childhood which may have caused memory-blocks. In his visual autobiography, Sam will write poems and short prose pieces, and will present these with childhood photographs, poems he wrote as a child, and current posed photographs to explore the divisions between image and text, poetry and prose, memory and fantasy.

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Humanities

Hands-on Utopia: the Architectural Appropriations of Rirkrit Tiravanija

This History of Art thesis project will examine how the contemporary participatory art of Rirkrit Tiravanija overlaps with and departs from the work of Hlio Oiticica in 1960s Brazil. Rather than creating discrete objects, these artists engender interactive situations. Recently dubbed relational art, such installations involve the viewer in various social activities, such as cooking or dancing, thereby challenging the distinction between art and everyday life. While Oiticica’s work emphasizes the relationship between participation and political agency, Tiravanija’s art examines the interface between artifice and leisure activities. Examining the relationship between these two practices, Jordan will draw upon theories of the ‘everyday’, the aesthetics of relational art, and the politics of socially critical installation art, in addition to conducting research at the Palais de Tokyo (Paris) and at Documenta XII (Kassel, Germany).

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Humanities

Blankwall: A Poetic Interpretation of Interracial Modernity and the Harlem Renaissance

Chad will travel to New York and New Haven to perform research on the unusual interracial collaborations and intercultural exchanges which occurred during the Harlem Renaissance, and this material will be used to compose a series of 25-30 poems. Inspired by recent critical discourses that redescribe modernism as a set of interracial dynamics, these poems will be composed from the perspective of a contemporary author imagining a bicultural past in modernity that potentially effaces the concreteness of the authors racial identity through his anonymity as the poetic speaker. The primary aim of this project is to produce a poetry in which the racial identity of the author is neither emphasized nor omitted, and which enables the reader, regardless of ethnicity, to discover a previously unrecognized bicultural identity.

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Humanities