Women in a Landscape of Change

The recent influx of modernity and opportunity into Ireland has profoundly affected the countrys social, geographical and cultural framework. In response to growing social pressure and the relaxation of the power of the Catholic Church, Ireland has changed many repressive laws regarding divorce and homosexuality and has closed antiquated institutions, such as the Magdalen Laundries. Louisa will research the effects of these changes on the social fabric of Ireland by interviewing women from different facets of Irish society regarding their newly emerging cultural identity. She will also visit historical and geographical sites that are suggested by the interviewees. Utilizing the mediums of film, photography and landscape painting, Louisa will draw on both new and old traditions to illustrate a changing portrait of Ireland and the women that live there.

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Humanities

Role of Peripheral Participants and Staging in Platonic Dialogues

Platonic dialogues usually consist of an interrogative discourse between Socrates and his interlocutor, situated in a specific setting, much like a stage, with other people present and participating somehow. Amin will investigate the role of peripheral participants and the staging of the dialogue in some essential texts known to be mostly concerning modes of discourse, namely Gorgias and Protagoras, as well as two early dialogues, “Crito” and “Meno”. Amin will examine these texts in the light of modern theories of discourse and performance while paying specific attention to cultural significations and the spatial staging of both the ancient Athenian forum and a modern U.S. courtroom. Amin’s analysis involves a comparison of the relations between the platonic characters and their relation to the staging of the dialogue.

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Humanities

A Specter Haunting South Africa': Cuba's Symbolic Importance in the South African Anti-Apartheid Struggle, 1975-1991

Revolutionary Cuba provided international support and financial assistance to the liberation movements throughout southern African. Cuba’s foreign policy of international revolution and its liberation discourse crossed boundaries erected by the apartheid state and influenced the South African emancipation movement. Despite a strong public rapport between Cuba and anti-Apartheid leaders, the majority of research on Cubas foreign policy towards Africa has excluded South Africa. Drawing on archival research conducted at the University of Cape Town and South African national archives, Margaux hopes to contribute to the analysis of Cuba’s symbolic significance to the anti-Apartheid struggle. She will trace the origin of Cuba’s involvement in the South Africa liberation movement beginning in 1975 with Cuba’s increase of support to African revolutionary movements and ending in 1991 with Nelson Mandelas visit to Cuba.

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Humanities

The Loneliest Brides in America: Japanese War Brides and African American Servicemen After WWII

Immediately following the end of World War II, the United States stationed nearly 450,000 troops in Japan. The U.S. occupation of Japan led to intimate relationships between American Servicemen and Japanese women, resulting in a large number of marriages. Between 1947 and 1975, an estimated 45,000 Japanese women immigrated to the United States as wives of U.S. Servicemen. Most scholarship on the subject focuses on the relationships between Japanese war brides and White American GIs. However, a significant number of these Japanese women came to the United States with their African American husbands; yet their stories remain largely untold. Through extensive archival research and oral histories, Sonia will re-examine gender and race relations in the post-war United States through the lens of the Japanese war bride and African-American GI.

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Humanities

The Presence of Arthuriana in the Philippines: An Analysis of A Filipino Arthurian text

This project sets out to examine the acquisition of the Arthurian literary cycle by the canon of Filipino literature. Focusing on the only two Filipino translated Arthurian texts, Tablante de Ricamonte and Percibal, Stefanie will be doing analytical and comparative work on the texts and the Spanish counterparts from which they are derived. Traveling to Chicago and the Philippines, she will gain access to these 19th century, medieval-influenced manuscripts and in the Philippines, have the opportunity to consult with the mother of Filipino folklore, scholar Damiana L. Eugenio. Her ultimate goal is to ascertain what original elements of the tradition have been maintained in the translations and to determine what Filipino literature has contributed to the greater Arthurian literary cycle.

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Humanities

Uncovering the Genesis of Omagua: A Contact Language of Peruvian Amazonia

Most languages spoken today are of roughly direct descent from other, perhaps extinct, languages. Latin is the famous progenitor of the Romance languages. However, the pre-history of some languages is not one of direct descent, but rather of contact, or mixture. Omagua is a highly endangered, pre-Columbian contact language of Peruvian Amazonia, with only two remaining speakers. Building off of previous work, Zachary will conduct eight weeks of fieldwork in Peru. With more comprehensive linguistic data, he will employ standard historical-linguistic methods to determine the languages involved in the genesis of Omagua and sketch the socio-cultural and grammatical results of contact. Zachary’s work will contribute to research on contact languages generally, as well as shed light on the interactions and movements of indigenous populations before the advent of Europeans.

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Humanities