Religious Hierarchy in Ancient Mycenae: A Contextual Analysis of Figurine Production at Petsas House

Figurines in the shape of humans, animals, and inanimate objects, such as furniture, have been found in excavations throughout the archaeological site of Mycenae, a Bronze Age settlement and palatial center. Samantha will investigate the production patterns of these figurines by analyzing archaeological data from a Mycenaean ceramics center, Petsas House. By comparing these figurines to those from other Mycenae excavation sites, she will attempt to make inferences about the distribution of figurines and the social structure of Mycenae. Previous scholarship has suggested that Mycenaean religion was socially stratified, with figurines being a main expression of popular religion. Samanthas main research will determine whether Petsas House produced its figurines in accordance with an official, elite religion, or, conversely, if Petsas House produced for the common people and cult.

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Humanities

Reporters and Reforged Identities: Negotiating Narratives of Violence through the Journalistic Enterprise

The body of the slain journalist, elevated to heroic proportions, has become indispensable in contemporary constructions of Filipino nationalism and democracy. This project will compare two episodes in the history of Philippine media that fortify the journalists presence in the Filipino imagination: the three-day broadcast by Radio Veritas during the 1986 People Power Revolution and the 2009 Maguindanao Massacre. Between June and August, Clarissa will engage in archival research at the National Library of the Philippines in Manila and conduct interviews with news media personnel and anti-impunity campaigners. She will examine how community efforts and legislative attempts to combat violence against media workers organize practices of Filipino citizenship around demands raised by investigative journalists for greater government responsibility and transparency.

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Humanities

Sentiments of (Be)longing: Queer Undocumented Immigrants in Search of Home

Though growing rapidly, the literature on the displacement of immigrants within the U.S. rarely addresses queer undocumented immigrants. By engaging with theories of affect, Marco’s project will explore the experiences of displacement queer undocumented immigrants encounter in their search for home. Through qualitative interviews, Marco will bring together two seemingly unrelated identities — “queer” and “immigrant” — exploring the complications of experience and sentiment driven by the dwelling that takes place in search of home; an engagement of the body in relation to a fragmented self. Ultimately, by illuminating forms of contact these queer undocumented immigrants have with their homeland, Marco hopes to provide a theoretical framework that engages in their navigation between being queer and undocumented, leading to a re-imagining of the body as a site of home.

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Humanities

Speaking the Self: Testimony and Self-Development in Jane Eyre and Villette

Current Bio: Brittany is now working with SURF, supporting undergraduate research. Haas Scholars Project: Brittany’s project will first explore the possibilities and limitations of fictional testimony to enact a process of trauma recovery. She will plumb the formal and imagerial depths of Charlotte Brontë’s novels Jane Eyre and Villette against a background of theoretical work engaged with trauma. She will narrow her critical eye upon the ways in which these two novels articulate their respective heroines psychological encounters with inaccessible stores of traumatic memory through narrative acts of viewing. Brittany will rely on close readings of the texts to assess how each novel views trauma, and how this correlates to the heroines recovery. She will then broaden her analysis to address how Brontë’s novels respond to or resist representations of the complex relationship between trauma and perception at large in the Gothic genre.

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Humanities

Reading Sites, Dropping Lines: An Investigation into Unreliable Language on the Border

Nathaniel’s project will produce an experimental video and art show exploring the U.S./Mexico border as it is situated temporally, spatially and psychically. By living in Tijuana and crossing the border daily for six weeks; interviewing activists, architects and academics; and providing volunteer humanitarian aid to migrants, Nathaniel will investigate how the histories of the U.S./Mexico border are embodied by the people who pass through it, and by various sites along its path. Focusing his research on three primary border locations — the San Ysidro border checkpoint, the Friendship Park monument that marks the starting point of the U.S./Mexico border, and the Sonoran Desert — Nathaniel will explore the relationship between the stories and rhetoric used to describe geographical borders, and how both have shifted and/or remained stagnant over time.

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Humanities

Sculpting Memory: Reading Berlin's Book Burning Memorial

What can a close reading of Berlin’s Book Burning Memorial offer to elucidate conflicts of remembering a turbulent past? Using libraries and archives in Berkeley and Berlin, Isabella will research the history and development of the current memorial; its public reception; and different uses of its location (Bebelplatz) over time. This research will also entail an in-person exploration of the memorial’s tactile and sculptural aspects, reading the memorial as an artwork confronting the past and processing history through its form within the city landscape. Isabella’s research will be grounded in scholarship on memory, commemoration, and making history tactile and present. Traumatic events are widespread, and this localized study in Berlin, while obviously not addressing all such events, offers a perspective on the process of healing and reconciliation within the cityscape.

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Humanities